Consequences of past economic activities

- reduced species diversity of the forest ecosystems (economically significantly increased representation of spruce, at the expense of admix trees, which occupies about 83% of the forest area, and with partial representation of pine at almost 7% of the area; however, only a fraction of the original representation - approximately 1 / 14 - has fir trees, which now occupy less than 1% of the forest area, than the beech tree with an area share of nearly 6% which is one quarter of the original representation and sycamore which reaches only a fraction of the original representation.

- Disruption of the gene pool of the main tree species

- Existential threat to some native species or to the local populations (yew, elm, mountain ecotype of spruce from the Modrava area; due to the lack of younger vegetation, other trees such as fir are under a threat in the long-term horizon)

- Violations of age and spatial construction of the forest and representation of the various stages of development,

- Changed shape and strength parameters of the spruce, evolving into fully involved monocultures, increase the risk of damage from wind and snow,

- Disruption of the water regime by misguided drainage schemes in order to increase the volume and "safety" of timber production and by inappropriately guided transport routes and changes in the composition of forests. The outcome is the launch of the "short water cycle" in the landscape into the long water - planetary cycle.

- Distortion of the links between the basic factors of the forest ecosystem (for example vegetation - herbivores-carnivores)

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